Posts tagged ·

painting

·...

Three Towers

no comments
Three Laccan Towers, Watercolor Painting by Jenny Armitage

"Three Luccan Towers" (17 x 19 watercolor) $500

Another Italian painting, this time of Lucca.  The view is from a window in yet a fourth tower.  I will have to paint the tower we climbed.  The oak trees growing from it’s roof give it a surreal feel.


Or purchase a fine art print.

SociBook del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon

Classic Brass

no comments
Classic Brass, Watercolor of a French Horn and Trumpet by Jenny Armitage

Classic Brass (17 x 19 watercolor) $600


Or purchase a fine art print.

SociBook del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon

Top of Milan

no comments
Top of Milan Painting by Jenny Armitage of an Italian Cathedral

Top of Milan (watercolor 14 x 22) Reserved for Spring Watercolor Society of Oregon Show

When we Armitages travel, we climb things–towers, monuments, mountains, cathedrals, arches– we generally go up for the purpose of looking down.  We are never disappointed.  We weren’t disappointed in Milan.  But the Milan Cathedral rooftop is different.  The rooftop itself is an amazing place to be.  It would be an amazing place were it on the ground floor.  Here is my first painting of the marble forest that lives atop the Milan Duomo.

This painting may be purchased through the Watercolor Society of Oregon Spring 2015 show. Or purchase a fine art print.

SociBook del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon

Licorice Pieces

no comments
"Licorice Pieces" Painting of a Clarinet in Watercolor by Jenny Armitage

Licorice Pieces (11 x 16 watercolor) $450

Another clarinet portrait.  Orange suits it don’t you think?

 

Or purchase a fine art print.

SociBook del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon

Rue Galande

no comments
Rue Galande, Watercolor of Paris by Jenny Armitage

Rue Galande (watercolor 19 x 13) $500

Another painting taken from our trip to Europe last summer.  This charming little street is close to Nortre Dame, but at least a little off the beaten path.    Like many of the streets in the area, it curves charmingly.

I poured this painting in much the same manner as  July in Florence.  The process is much like batik and leads to clear color passages that make buildings glow.

July in Florence, Painting of Old Florence by Jenny Armitage

July in Florence (13 x 23 watercolor) $600


Or purchase a fine art print.

SociBook del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon

And Suddenly, The Duomo

no comments
And Suddenly The Duomo, Painting By Jenny Armitage

And Suddenly the Duomo (15 x23 watercolor) Reserved

Old town Florence streets are shaded lanes so narrow they almost feel like tunnels running at irregular angles to each other.  The view at the end of the tunnel is often as not another narrow lane cutting the street off at not quite a right angle.   But here there the streets open into plazas with startling sunny views of churches, cathedrals, bridges, train stations and castles.  Walking from our apartment, the Duomo complex burst upon us in much the same way–the light at the end of the tunnel.

Another poured watercolor painting, a process much like batik.

This painting is reserved for a show but you may purchase a fine art print.

SociBook del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon

Paint Tube Hills—Playing with Perspective Again

no comments
Paint Tube Hills, Original Painting by Jenny Armitage

Paint Tube Hill (16 x 22 watercolor) $600

Realistic paintings are representations of three dimensional space on a two dimensional surface. This painting plays with that concept by depicting three dimensional objects like paint tubes and brushes resting on a two dimensional painting. But of course the tubes and brushes are also two dimensional representations of three dimensional space.


or purchase a fine art print.

SociBook del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon

A Bouquet of Reeds

no comments
Bouquet of Reeds, Painting by Jenny Armitage

Bouquet of Reeds (11 x 14 watercolor on Aquabord) $300

This is my first painting of my brand new rental toy, the saxophone.   Actually, my sax is far from new, but for my purposes, it’s just fine. I’ve paired it with what is turning out to be most painted instrument, the clarinet.  The clarinet itself is hard to compose with because it’s so long and skinny.  It isn’t metal, it’s lacquered wood; so it does have the shine that drew me to painting instruments in the first place.  But it’s black body is the perfect foil for brass.   So here it is as co-star to the sax.

The painting’s name is thanks to my best friend and critique, who also lent me her daughter’s clarinet.  So I owe a double thanks to Terrie for this one.

Painted on cradled aquabord.  May be framed or hung as is.

Original available at Art in the Valley, Corvallis Oregon. Prints available though FineArtAmerica.com.

SociBook del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon