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tower

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After Midnight, A Fairytale View of the Munich Rathous

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After Midnight, Watercolor of Munich Townhall by Jenny Armitage

After Midnight (17 x 23 watercolor) $700

After Midnight began with a lecture and demonstration I did for the The Watercolor Society of Oregon’s Fall 2016 Convention.  For the demo, I painted the Munich Rathaus Tower six time in various stages of completeness.  Below is the one painting of the six I  completed:

Munich Townhall Tower, Original Watercolor Painting by Jenny Armitage

Munich Rathaus (8 x 13 watercolor) $200

I liked the this little painting so much, I felt compelled to do it again in a larger format.  But I didn’t want to just repeat the painting on a larger scale.  The tower, like many in Germany, reminds me of fairy tale illustrations.  So I ran with that notion tweaking the scene just a little to add a rather unreal illustrative moon and an impossible sky.

 

The Rathaus Tower Paintings

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Three Towers

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Three Laccan Towers, Watercolor Painting by Jenny Armitage

"Three Luccan Towers" (17 x 19 watercolor) $500

Another Italian painting, this time of Lucca.  The view is from a window in yet a fourth tower.  I will have to paint the tower we climbed.  The oak trees growing from it’s roof give it a surreal feel.


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Between Amusements

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At the Fair, Watercolor Painting by Jenny Armitage

Between Amusements (17 x 21 watercolor) $700

For the last four years I’ve been taking pictures of the Oregon State Fair confident that with all those people and colors there must be a good painting in there somewhere.   Four years of pictures with images taken from four different photos and I finally have one.


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Lucca

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Bike Lucca, a Painting of Italy, by Jenny Armitage

Bike Lucca (watercolor 16 x 21) $700

This is Lucca.  It could be just about any narrow lane in the old part of a Tuscan city, but this particular lane is in Lucca.  The bicyclist is appropriate, because Lucca is a bicyclist’s city.  The old city wall around town has been paved as a broad street for pedestrians and cyclists, and everyone, natives and tourists alike seem to spend much of their time biking the wall.  Down in the city, bikes are as common as at Oxford.


Fine art prints can be purchased here.

Here is a view of Lucca from the city wall:

Two Towers, a Digitally Altered Photo of Lucca by Jenny Armitage

Two Towers (Digitally Altered Photo)

Prints of Two Towers can be purchased here.

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Riomaggiore

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Riomaggiore Hillside, Painting by Jenny Armitage

Riomaggiore Hillside (16 x 22 watercolor) SOLD

We visited the Cinque Terre or Five Lands  in 2012.  Clinging to the the cliffs about the Italian riviera, these charming wine and fishing villages are an Italian national park and a tourist magnet during the summer.  I painted Monterrosso, the largest of these villages last year.  This is Riomaggiore, the smallest of the Cinque Terre, and the first village many tourists see.  It was the first village we visited.  And yes we were charmed by it’s pocket sized harbor and steep narrow streets.   But these first paintings are not of the houses on the harbor cliffs, but the vineyard hills.

A Slice of Riomaggiore, watercolor by Jenny Armitage

A Slice of Riomaggiore (10 x 12 watercolor) SOLD

These paintings have sold, but you may still purchase fine art prints here.

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Saint Pauls Cathedral

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A Spire of Saint Pauls, Painting the Cathedral by Jenny Armitage

A Spire of Saint Paul's (11 x 15 watercolor) $300

This is one of the twin clock tower spires of Saint Paul’s Cathedral in London.  I love Saint Paul’s Cathedral though it is nothing like the Gothic Cathedrals I fell in love with on my first trip the England.  Unlike England’s early cathedrals, Saint Paul’s was designed by a single man, Sir Christopher Wren and built over just thirty years.  The result is a clean coherent building rather unlike the the quirky cathedrals I first admired.

Wren designed and saw built numerous churches in the vicinity to compliment and be complimented by the cathedral.   But in the London Blitz practically the entire neighborhood was bombed and burned to the ground.  The cathedral is now surrounded by modern offices.  The Millennium Bridge now leads directly to it providing a very modern show case for Wren’s jewel.


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